The First Sail

Before taking Maluhia out for a sail on the Pacific we had to attach the boom to the mast, as well as both her main and jib sails. But, before attaching the sails we had some mending to do on one of the main sail batten pockets. While we were at it, why don’t we add a UV protection strip to the luff and leech (specific sides of the sail) of our jib? Having your sails exposed full time in sunny conditions can damage sails that are unprotected. UV protection helps to prolong the life of the sails. Our main sail has it’s own handy dandy sail bag that attaches to the boom and covers the sail after it has been neatly flaked (folded) on top of itself. But, our jib without a cover would be left naked and exposed to the elements.  It wouldn’t take long for it to be destroyed by UV.  Living in California has its advantages for finding reputable sailing resources nearby. We took our sails to Ullman Sails (literally right down the road!) and they had our sails back to us within 2 weeks.

In the mean time there were plenty of other things to do. Like, if you want to go sailing on the Pacific Ocean, you might want to have life jackets on board your boat. Oh, and perhaps some emergency equipment in case the Coast Guard decides to pull you over. So, what did we do to keep busy while we waited for our sails?

  • Ordered and Received Mustang Survival Life Jackets. Check!
  • Ordered, Received, Registered and Mounted our EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon).
  • Checked the engine oil, added coolant, and ran the engine.
  • Scheduled and passed our Coast Guard live-aboard inspection.
  • Bought new flares (We found all of our old ones expired as a result of our live aboard inspection).
  • Filled up both water tanks and flushed all of the antifreeze out of our water hoses.
  • Printed and distributed for-sale signs for our two CQR anchors.
  • Hooked up our wi-fi so now we can work from the boat.
  • Got our refrigeration working and cooling.
  • Attached our lazy jacks.

In one afternoon with a very light breeze, we attached and hoisted all our sails right in the slip. Many of our neighbors commented about how it was a perfect afternoon for some slip sailing. It was pretty nice out, but it just wasn’t the same as actually being out there. So the next day, we went out there! It felt so good to get out on the water and go sailing. It was our first sail with our new boat. We were both super excited and really needed that time on the water. On our way out of the harbor We passed a bunch of basking sea lions. Nature! Our 2 hour sail was marvelously peaceful and the boat handled very comfortably. The wind blew a steady 5-10 knots, and the wave heights were nonexistent. We had to pinch ourselves, were we sailing on the Pacific Ocean or Lake Macbride. Judging by the color of the water, we weren’t on Lake Macbride. Judging by how cold it was, I wasn’t sure.

Denise at the helm     Great day for a sail

Anacapa Island in the distance     The Gold Coast

Too cold for Cali!     Sea lions

15 comments

  • Prayers that you always have a safe journey. St. Christopher to watch over you always.

  • Congrats on getting out on the water. These memories are going to embed in your memory for a lifetime. Keep it going!

  • Grant – what anchor(s) did you buy?
    What CQR’s are you selling and how much do you figure they might fetch? I too am in buying/selling mode.

    d

    • Hi Dennis,

      We bought a 45lb Manson Supreme. We are selling the CQR’s for a little under half their original price. We sold one already but, haven’t had much luck with the other.

      Thanks!

      • I debated Manson 45 vs Rocna 44. Just took delivery of Rocna – I’m sure you did lots of research – what tipped scale to Mandon for you???

        What CQR did you get sold and how much?? I am trying to sell an unused CQR 35.

        d

      • First, both are really good anchors! We went for the Manson because another boat owner had one at the Marina in Wisconsin and they had really good results with the Manson during storms. They never dragged anchor. Then in Practical Sailor, Vol. 39, No. 2, there was a review done for a series of anchors based on how quickly your anchor will reset when the wind shifts 180 degrees. While both the Rocna and the Manson performed relatively close in the tests, the Manson performed slightly better. But, we still think both are really good anchors. We sold the 25lb CQR for $150. The 35lb is still for sale at $180.

        Thanks!

        Denise & Grant

      • Thanks for your input! I liked the PS article, they do a good job. I did a Craig’s List at Windthrop Harbor for the CQR #35 @ $210 and got no bites – good to hear you sold one. Anchors I am keeping: 1- My Fortress FX37 (from my Flicka!) I know, a bit overkill on a 20′ but now just right. 2- Two Danforth 20’s (stern and backup for lost anchor).

        I would like to finish out with a nice Fisherman, like a Luke, but weight is critical and I just can’t have what I want unless of course I get rid of my crew!

  • Thanks for your input! I liked the PS article, they do a good job. I did a Craig’s List at Windthrop Harbor for the CQR #35 @ $210 and got no bites – good to hear you sold one.
    Anchors I am keeping:
    1- My Fortress FX37 (from my Flicka!) I know, a bit overkill on a 20′ but now just right.
    2- Two Danforth 20’s (stern and backup for lost anchor).

    I would like to finish out with a nice Fisherman, like a Luke, but weight is critical
    and I just can’t have what I want unless, of course, I get rid of my crew!

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